Richard Mittenthal

Richard Mittenthal

President and CEO

Richard Mittenthal is President and CEO of TCC Group. Since joining the firm in 1989, he has led consulting and planning assignments for a wide range of clients, including the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Japan Foundation/Center for Global Partnership, the Ford Foundation, the Altman Foundation, Third Street Music School Settlement, the Margaret Cargill Foundation, the Nelson-Atkins Museum, the Jewish Museum, the US Holocaust Memorial Museum, the Studio Museum in Harlem, the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, the Freeman Foundation, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, The Children's Defense Fund, the United Way of New York City, the Institute for Advanced Studies, the Charles Hayden Foundation, and the Roosevelt Institute.

Grow Stronger & Achieve Greater Impact

Earlier this month, Grantmakers for Effective Organizations (GEO) held its National Conference in Minneapolis – bringing together nearly 900 foundation professionals, executives of nonprofit organizations, consultants, and other stakeholders for a stimulating and inspiring two days. The organization promoted the conference as “an event that offers participants the opportunity to explore the most relevant topics in the philanthropic field and hear new ideas for smarter grantmaking practices that enable nonprofits to grow stronger and achieve better results.” Note the emphasis on “grow stronger and achieve better results.”

I had the privilege of attending along with four of my TCC colleagues, two of whom were leading sessions that reinforced the focus on achieving greater impact. Continue reading

4 Predictions for the Future of the Nonprofit Sector

A few years ago, we did a governance study for the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. I interviewed the board chair, who incidentally invented Microsoft Word and Excel, and I asked him if the three board meetings they had each year was the right number. He said, “Well, four is too many and two is not enough, so three is probably right.”

An interesting way to think about almost everything. If six cookies aren’t enough, and eight cookies are too many, have seven.

So, when I thought about my presentation at the BoardSource Leadership Forum, I decided that three predictions weren’t enough and five predictions were too many. So I have four. Continue reading